NaNoWriMo Wrap Up

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Today is the very last day of National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo).  I wrote 67,831 words in 29 days, passing the 50,000 word mark (with 5,0005 words at time of validation) on November 22, 2018.  I’m spending most of today continuing to write my story in the hopes that I can reach “The End” before midnight.

It’s been a turbulent November this year.  I’m part of the Municipal Liaison team for my area (ML is a fancy term for an unpaid volunteer).  There are three of us.  The region is active enough that it needs three of us.  Due to work demanding time, energy, and overtime, for one co-ML and the other ending up sick not once but twice during November, I was a solo act for possibly half the month.  I know this was no fault of theirs, and I love them both dearly for doing as much as they did while overwhelmed with work/illness.  It just meant more time being an ML and slightly less time for writing. Continue reading

Art Culture

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On my recent vacation, we spent a couple days in Asheville, NC, which is one of the centers of art culture in the state.  I just wanted to take a few moments to appreciate that about Asheville, and talk more generally about what I mean by art culture, and how I find it wherever I go.

First, what do I mean by art culture?

This isn’t just an artsy way to say “art and culture” or a trendy phrase I picked up somewhere.  To me, art culture, is a way of life, a way of being, and a way of being in community with others.  Art, as I’m using it here, is a very broad term that encompasses almost any creative endeavor.  That can be the art of cooking, the art of weaving, the art of book binding, the art of painting, the art of writing, the art of making, the art of architecture, and anything and everything in between.

So what I mean by art culture, is a person, place, or community, that embraces that definition of art and the support of art and everything that comes along with it.  This might mean having accessible studio space in a community, a university providing free materials for students to use in their maker spaces, a local community willing to pay artists for their work with an understanding of how time intensive it is to make, or a local business that encourages art related groups to come and meet there even if it doesn’t lead to extra revenue for them.

Asheville is a great example of the broad definition of art culture. Continue reading